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Notes on H.P. Blavatsky's Secret Doctrine
Volume 1 (page 4 of notes)Notes on H.P. Blavatsky's Secret Doctrine
Volume 1 (page 4 of notes)

The seven stanzas of the Book of Dyzan refer to the first stages of creation, called the 7 days of creation in Bible, the seven creations in the Puranas.

The first stanza describes the state of ONE ALL durning Pralaya, before the first flutter of re-awakening manifestation.

The second stanza describes a state so like that described in the first stanza as to be empiracly undifferentiated from that described in the first stanza. Blavatsky tells us that only inner intuition, or the higher faculties to grasp the difference. She adds that all these stanzas appeal to the inner faculties rather than to the empiracal mind or conciousness.

Stanza three describes the re-awakening after the Pralaya, and the monad is described. The phrase awakening of the worlds is employed, and the statement that the term monad can equally apply to the tiniest atom as well as to a solar system.

Stanza four describes the differentation of the "germ" of the universe into a septernary hierarchy of concious divine powers. The term Dhyan Cohans is introduced as a name for these. They are described as intelligent beings embodying manifestations of the One law, which we call the laws of nature. A comparison to Hindu philosophy's creation of the Gods is made.

Stanza five describes the formation of a "whirlwind", which condenses into a "nebula". This further coalesces into a solar system, or a planet as the case may be.

Stanza six describes the final formulation of a world, and is related to the period we are currently in.

Stanza seven continues this history down to evolution of man, this is the end of the first volume of the Secret Doctrine.

On pursuing the english translations of stanza I and stanza 2, it seems evident that stanza 1 is describing a completely quiesent state, while stanza 2 begins to show signs of desire to manifest, the father and mother, though not yet differentiated from the One, and the light, are beginning to manifest. As Blavatsky stated, this is more of a feeling than something I could attest to with quotes from the english translations. I only began to form this opinion after immersing myself in the text for about an hour. I am particularly struck by the realization that although I state "begins to show signs of desire" I can assign no source or object which is "desiring". The trinity mentioned, father, mother, and light, are as yet not differentiated from the One, the darkness. There is no creator, no identifiable intelligence, the events seen to evolve out of a necessity.

Stanza 3 clearly identifies the mother as a watery quality, and the father as a firey quality. The darkness radiates light, the light penatrates the mother, and enlivens the egg, in the depths of the mother, the three then fall into four. The radiant essence become 7 inside, and 7 outside. The name OEAOHOO is mentioned here, so far light study has revealed it is an unpronouncable word refering to the Parabrahm, the completely undifferentiated ONE.

Now as discussed earlier, the Parabrahm cannot create, but out of neccessity a son is created, OEAOHOO the younger, who joins with the Dhyan Cohens thereby creation is possible. OEAOHOO the younger is described as "He shines forth as the Son", "He is the blazing dragon of Wisdom". The stanza continues The One takes is Four, and takes unto itself Three (mentioned above ?) and this produces Seven, the Sapta, which in turn produce the Tridasa, or the hosts and the multitudes. He shuts out the Above, and leaves the Below to be seen as the great illusion. He turns the Upper (Above) into a shoreless sea of fire, and marks out places for the shining ones, and the one (OAOHOO the younger ?) manifested into the great waters.

The Father and Mother spin a web whose upper end is fastened to Spirit, the light of the One Darkness, and whose lower end is fastened to Matter. This web is the universe, spun out of two substances made in One, which is SVABHAVAT.